Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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DubyDubyDo
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Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

Post by DubyDubyDo »

We have an ~8 year old German Shepherd/Greyhound mix who is showing signs of rear end paralysis.

We thought it was a knee injury when we noticed him having difficulty walking, but the veterinarian diagnosed a nerve issue from a lack of pain sensation and no reflex from his rear legs. Now his tail doesn’t wag. :(

Looking back, he started having difficulty sitting still earlier this summer with his back end sliding while sitting on our hardwood floor. We weren’t too concerned at the time, but hindsight brings a sharper focus.

Next step will be an MRI, then some tough decisions depending on the findings. I’ve been around dogs my entire life and haven’t encountered this condition. Anyone dealt with this before?
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St LouieLouie
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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DubyDubyDo wrote: 20 Oct 2020 08:26 am We have an ~8 year old German Shepherd/Greyhound mix who is showing signs of rear end paralysis.

We thought it was a knee injury when we noticed him having difficulty walking, but the veterinarian diagnosed a nerve issue from a lack of pain sensation and no reflex from his rear legs. Now his tail doesn’t wag. :(

Looking back, he started having difficulty sitting still earlier this summer with his back end sliding while sitting on our hardwood floor. We weren’t too concerned at the time, but hindsight brings a sharper focus.

Next step will be an MRI, then some tough decisions depending on the findings. I’ve been around dogs my entire life and haven’t encountered this condition. Anyone dealt with this before?
Very common in Shepherds as they get older.
I have had many large dogs so I'll give you a natural way to try that won't be so expensive.
Plus, you can use all the supplements too.

Go to Amazon and buy these supplements-

Cissus Extract (Naturebell)
Glucosamine with Chondroitin Turmeric MSM Boswellia (Compound from Vimerson Health).
Nutricost Alpha Lipoic Acid 600mg

Add olive oil to your dogs food - say 2 tablespoons per day.

Give your dog these supplements twice a day / with food.
Test it for a month...I hope you'll like the results.

If your dog is overweight you must put it on a controlled diet.
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DubyDubyDo
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

Post by DubyDubyDo »

Thanks for the natural supplement advice, certainly wouldn’t hurt. He’s a healthy 67lbs for his size, lean muscle, until his glutes started degenerating. We’ll have to cut back on portions too, since he’s mostly floor-bound now.
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acco40
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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Dachshunds are known for this condition. Kind a like the old joke, what's worse than a giraffe with a sore neck? A dachshund with a bad back.

Sadly, we had a dachshund (standard) with this condition. Essentially, they were paralyzed - lose of motor control wrt rear legs and loss of bowel and urinary control too. The good news is it didn't appear to be painful.

Intervertebral Disc Disease

The dachshund breed has a genetic condition called chondrodystrophy. The condition is bred into dwarf breeds like the dachshund. Chondystrophy means disorder of the cartilage and causes abnormal bone development during growth from puppy to adult. The long bones in the body are most affected, and this creates a dog with short limbs. A healthy dog's spinal discs are surrounded by a fibrous capsule and have gel inside. However, with age the discs become more fibrous, lose water and calcify. This degeneration is intervertebral disc disease, or IVDD, which can lead to paralysis. In dog breeds that don't have chondrodystrophy, disc damage typically appears around ages six to eight years. In the dachshund it appears as early as 12 to 18 months.

Signs and Symptoms

Disc damage usually occurs in the cervical spine in the neck area, or in the lower back. If your dachshund has cervical disc damage he is likely to show signs of lameness in the front legs, a reluctance to move and muscle spasms. He may also cry for no apparent reason; this is because he is in pain. He is likely to show more severe and debilitating symptoms if he has IVDD in his back. The pain may make him lose his appetite and he may be reluctant to go up and down stairs. You might feel tension around his abdomen. His back legs may become paralyzed and he is likely to lose control of his bladder and bowels. If you notice any of these symptoms, get him to your vet immediately, as time is of the essence. Your vet is more likely to be able to prevent paralysis if he treats your pet as early as possible.

Treatment

Your vet might suggest an MRI scan to discover the extent of the damage. Dogs with less severe symptoms are usually given anti-inflammatory drugs and cage rest. However, a paralyzed dachshund needs surgery. The Dachshund Breed Council reports that paralyzed dogs who have corrective surgery for IVDD within 24 hours of the symptom appearing are more likely to make a full recovery. Your vet will probably refer your pet to a specialist for the operation. Your dachshund needs a period of rehabilitation after his surgery. This might combine canine physiotherapy with cage rest for at least six to eight weeks. If your dachshund doesn't recover from paralysis, or has residual lameness, you can help him get about by buying him a doggy wheelchair or cart that supports his back legs.

Prevention

If possible, discourage your lively little chap from jumping off furniture or out of the car. If he manages to climb up somewhere high, lift him down. What other dogs can do with ease, your dachshund does at his peril. Indeed, all dogs with elongated bodies should be discouraged from activities that could suddenly jolt the spine, such as jumping down and jumping over. Keeping him at his ideal weight also helps prevent disc damage. A miniature dachshund weighs about 11 pounds, and a standard dachshund is about 16 pounds.

- https://pets.thenest.com/dachshund-paralysis-5861.html
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

Post by Sixto Lezcano »

We adopted a dachshund who recovered from hind leg paralysis. He was found crawling on a rural road, apparently some a hole left him to die. He was taken to a shelter where they gave him physical therapy consisting of holding him in a tub of water and he would try to move his legs. After several weeks he was able to walk. It took so long they almost fitted him for a skateboard to pull around on. He was never 100% of course. His hind legs sometimes gave out. He lived ten more years, died last August. In retrospect I think he had a ruptured disc.
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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DubyDubyDo wrote: 20 Oct 2020 08:26 am We have an ~8 year old German Shepherd/Greyhound mix who is showing signs of rear end paralysis.

We thought it was a knee injury when we noticed him having difficulty walking, but the veterinarian diagnosed a nerve issue from a lack of pain sensation and no reflex from his rear legs. Now his tail doesn’t wag. :(

Looking back, he started having difficulty sitting still earlier this summer with his back end sliding while sitting on our hardwood floor. We weren’t too concerned at the time, but hindsight brings a sharper focus.

Next step will be an MRI, then some tough decisions depending on the findings. I’ve been around dogs my entire life and haven’t encountered this condition. Anyone dealt with this before?
I was recently forced to put down my German Shepherd - he had cancer - and it was the toughest thing that I ever had to do.

I still haven’t forgiven myself and doubt that I ever will.

The very best of luck. I sincerely hope that you’re able to treat it and you have many years left with your dog.
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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I just lost my beloved Bloodhound. A few weeks ago he started to get tired on long walks. It looked like the beginning of bad hips or arthritis. It started getting worse. We got him on NSAIDs which had no affect. After doing research on his symptoms it was a ringer for degenerative myelopathy. It's Lou Gehrig's for dogs. He declined very quickly and could barely walk. He would sit down and get stuck and not be able to get up. We took him to the vet to confirm and had to let him go. It was tough because he was still himself. It's painless, they simply can't control their muscles any longer. There is no treatment.
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Sixto Lezcano
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

Post by Sixto Lezcano »

Tony Palazzolo wrote: 23 Jun 2021 13:15 pm I just lost my beloved Bloodhound. A few weeks ago he started to get tired on long walks. It looked like the beginning of bad hips or arthritis. It started getting worse. We got him on NSAIDs which had no affect. After doing research on his symptoms it was a ringer for degenerative myelopathy. It's Lou Gehrig's for dogs. He declined very quickly and could barely walk. He would sit down and get stuck and not be able to get up. We took him to the vet to confirm and had to let him go. It was tough because he was still himself. It's painless, they simply can't control their muscles any longer. There is no treatment.
I feel sorry for your loss. You did what you could.

Probably not much consolation, but in the movie Best In Show, the bloodhound was the champion.
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Tony Palazzolo
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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Sixto Lezcano wrote: 25 Jun 2021 12:43 pm
Tony Palazzolo wrote: 23 Jun 2021 13:15 pm I just lost my beloved Bloodhound. A few weeks ago he started to get tired on long walks. It looked like the beginning of bad hips or arthritis. It started getting worse. We got him on NSAIDs which had no affect. After doing research on his symptoms it was a ringer for degenerative myelopathy. It's Lou Gehrig's for dogs. He declined very quickly and could barely walk. He would sit down and get stuck and not be able to get up. We took him to the vet to confirm and had to let him go. It was tough because he was still himself. It's painless, they simply can't control their muscles any longer. There is no treatment.
I feel sorry for your loss. You did what you could.

Probably not much consolation, but in the movie Best In Show, the bloodhound was the champion.
He had a good life. It's been a long time, but I remember the Bloodhound in Best in Show. They are absolutely beautiful dogs. Very intelligent and stubborn, yet sweet and loyal. I would love to get another one, but the slobber is a killer with my wife. Almost 10 years of cleaning slobber off the ceiling.
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Red7
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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DubyDubyDo wrote: 20 Oct 2020 08:26 am We have an ~8 year old German Shepherd/Greyhound mix who is showing signs of rear end paralysis.

We thought it was a knee injury when we noticed him having difficulty walking, but the veterinarian diagnosed a nerve issue from a lack of pain sensation and no reflex from his rear legs. Now his tail doesn’t wag. :(

Looking back, he started having difficulty sitting still earlier this summer with his back end sliding while sitting on our hardwood floor. We weren’t too concerned at the time, but hindsight brings a sharper focus.

Next step will be an MRI, then some tough decisions depending on the findings. I’ve been around dogs my entire life and haven’t encountered this condition. Anyone dealt with this before?
Does he still have control of bladder and bowels or will he as the problem progresses? I have seen dogs who have lost their legs or their function get around quite well with a cart like device for their hind legs. Not ideal, but an alternative. Of course, if he becomes incontinent, you have very little choice. Having to make that decision is the worst part of owning a pet.
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

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Red7 wrote: 27 Jun 2021 20:37 pm
DubyDubyDo wrote: 20 Oct 2020 08:26 am We have an ~8 year old German Shepherd/Greyhound mix who is showing signs of rear end paralysis.

We thought it was a knee injury when we noticed him having difficulty walking, but the veterinarian diagnosed a nerve issue from a lack of pain sensation and no reflex from his rear legs. Now his tail doesn’t wag. :(

Looking back, he started having difficulty sitting still earlier this summer with his back end sliding while sitting on our hardwood floor. We weren’t too concerned at the time, but hindsight brings a sharper focus.

Next step will be an MRI, then some tough decisions depending on the findings. I’ve been around dogs my entire life and haven’t encountered this condition. Anyone dealt with this before?
Does he still have control of bladder and bowels or will he as the problem progresses? I have seen dogs who have lost their legs or their function get around quite well with a cart like device for their hind legs. Not ideal, but an alternative. Of course, if he becomes incontinent, you have very little choice. Having to make that decision is the worst part of owning a pet.
He did, but that would've been sometime soon. He was in no pain and was mentally himself. He was going downhill fast. Our biggest problem was steps. We have a lot of steps in our house. He had to go down steps to go outside and was becoming scared. Getting back up was another problem I may have been able to give him a couple more days but it was always going to be quick.
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Re: Canine Hind Leg Paralysis

Post by Red7 »

If we had the same empathy for the pain and suffering of the aged and sick that we do for our aging and sick pets, a lot more people could die with dignity.
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